Category Archives: Professional Certificate

Less than 2 weeks left!

There are less than 2 weeks left to register for your Certificate in Creative Placemaking course of study at NJIT.  The inaugural class of this exciting program is filling quickly and there are only 3 seats left!  Join this intimate class of cross-sector early, mid-career and change career professionals led by an outstanding faculty cohort of Creative Placemaking-related experts. 

Don’t miss your opportunity to achieve your professional Certificate in Creative Placemaking before the end of 2018!  This course will not be offered again
until Fall, 2019. 


For further information contact: 
info@CenterForCreativePlacemaking.com
You may register for the course here before Sept. 10th. 

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Is Creative Placemaking a good fit for Opportunity Zone planning?

 

Recently, through approval by the General Assembly and Governor Murphy, 169 census tracts in New Jersey were designated Opportunity Zones (OZs).  The identified OZs are located in municipalities across the state.  These are areas where the state would like to direct growth and that have some market potential to attract the kind of private investments that will help these communities become less distressed over time.

In “The Hill.com,” John Lettieri and Steve Glickman of the Economic Innovation Group opine that Local leadership is key for successful Opportunity Zones

The primary goal of Opportunity Zones is to encourage long-term equity investments in struggling communities, many of which have been excluded from the benefits of the national economic expansion in recent years. The recent stock market boom and prolonged period of record corporate profitability have resulted in a massive stockpile of unrealized capital gains wealth — over $6 trillion in corporate and individual holdings as of the end of 2017, according to our analysis of Federal Reserve data.

Because of Opportunity Zones, investors are now incentivized to reinvest those dollars into capital-starved, low-income communities. And, because investors are exclusively using their own capital without any up-front subsidy, there is no cap on how much capital can be put to work rebuilding communities. It is a nationally scalable incentive.

 

NJ Future recently analyzed existing data for the 169 NJ opportunity zones and found some interesting statistics:

Continue reading Is Creative Placemaking a good fit for Opportunity Zone planning?

Why is NOW the right time?

chicken.eggWhat comes first, the chicken or the egg?  In a rapidly growing era of new job creation, one could argue that it is often the chicken which comes first.  At least as far as new job creation in the field of Creative Placemaking, we can make this case.  The term “Creative Placemaking,” coined by former Chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, Rocco Landesman, was used to define a longstanding practice of utilizing the arts and culture to help revitalize communities.    Landesman became the “promoter-in-chief” of Creative Placemaking in 2010 by commissioning Ann Markusen and Anne Gadwa to write a white paper for the Mayor’s Institute on City Design.  The paper defined the term and was a seminal work in making a strong case for adoption of the practice.

According to the authors of the paper, “Creative placemaking animates public and private spaces, rejuvenates structures and streetscapes, improves local business viability and public safety, and brings diverse people together to celebrate, inspire, and be inspired.”   Landesman wisely set forth to create a funding mechanism for the practice separate from dependence on federal funding.  Instead, he brought together the leading executives from a dozen foundations   Kresge, Surdna, Mellon, Irvine, Knight, McKnight, Bloomberg and others – to partner in this pioneering work.  Luis Ubiñas of the Ford Foundation was the first chair to drive the collaboration, resulting in the creation of  ArtPlace America.

From our nation’s largest urban centers to the most quaint hamlets, in these relatively short eight years, the scope and practice of Creative Placemaking has grown faster and, I imagine, far beyond what even the early dreamers could have envisioned.  Over the years, as the field has spread across sectors of planning, engineering, technology, health, sustainability, governance, community and economic development, and further, the practice has been redefined and refined.

Professionals from all of these sectors are locally engaged in one or more aspects of their creative community planning primarily through volunteerism, as jobbers or within the capacity of their current job mandates.  Yet their resumes do not reflect recognition of professional expertise in the field.  Perhaps in a CV, one can expand on a description of their experience, but in the format of a resume, one  cannot identify themselves as “Creative Placemaker” without accompanying professional certification.

Why is “now” the right time for an institution of higher education to offer this professional Creative Placemaker certification?  Simply put, recent job openings describe Continue reading Why is NOW the right time?