Category Archives: Training

Why is NOW the right time?

chicken.eggWhat comes first, the chicken or the egg?  In a rapidly growing era of new job creation, one could argue that it is often the chicken which comes first.  At least as far as new job creation in the field of Creative Placemaking, we can make this case.  The term “Creative Placemaking,” coined by former Chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, Rocco Landesman, was used to define a longstanding practice of utilizing the arts and culture to help revitalize communities.    Landesman became the “promoter-in-chief” of Creative Placemaking in 2010 by commissioning Ann Markusen and Anne Gadwa to write a white paper for the Mayor’s Institute on City Design.  The paper defined the term and was a seminal work in making a strong case for adoption of the practice.

According to the authors of the paper, “Creative placemaking animates public and private spaces, rejuvenates structures and streetscapes, improves local business viability and public safety, and brings diverse people together to celebrate, inspire, and be inspired.”   Landesman wisely set forth to create a funding mechanism for the practice separate from dependence on federal funding.  Instead, he brought together the leading executives from a dozen foundations   Kresge, Surdna, Mellon, Irvine, Knight, McKnight, Bloomberg and others – to partner in this pioneering work.  Luis Ubiñas of the Ford Foundation was the first chair to drive the collaboration, resulting in the creation of  ArtPlace America.

From our nation’s largest urban centers to the most quaint hamlets, in these relatively short eight years, the scope and practice of Creative Placemaking has grown faster and, I imagine, far beyond what even the early dreamers could have envisioned.  Over the years, as the field has spread across sectors of planning, engineering, technology, health, sustainability, governance, community and economic development, and further, the practice has been redefined and refined.

Professionals from all of these sectors are locally engaged in one or more aspects of their creative community planning primarily through volunteerism, as jobbers or within the capacity of their current job mandates.  Yet their resumes do not reflect recognition of professional expertise in the field.  Perhaps in a CV, one can expand on a description of their experience, but in the format of a resume, one  cannot identify themselves as “Creative Placemaker” without accompanying professional certification.

Why is “now” the right time for an institution of higher education to offer this professional Creative Placemaker certification?  Simply put, recent job openings describe Continue reading Why is NOW the right time?


Certified Creative Placemaker

We are thrilled to share with you that New Jersey Instititute of Technology is offering the Creative Placemaking Certification through their Continuing Professional Education division.

This course of study will provide necessary professional accreditation for the person who wishes to be recognized as a leader of change in community. The practice of Creative Placemaking is increasingly being adopted by municipalities, counties and regions and is being applied neighborhood by neighborhood in communities large and small throughout the United States and across the globe. The time is now to develop recognized professional leaders of this practice.

The Certification course of study provides comprehensive classroom and field training in the broad principals and methodologies of the Creative Placemaking process.  The purpose of this certification course is to develop literacy, sensitivity, skills building and context of the field of practice in order for the graduate to be accepted and recognized as a leader in Creative Placemaking.

For many, this course of study will open an entirely new professional pathway.  For others, the certification will provide enhancement and professional credential for work they have already been doing.  For everyone who takes this course, the small class size, one-on-one attention, comprehensive curriculum, small group interaction and practical application will result in readiness to assume the challenges of Creative Placemaking leadership.

Core faculty for this program are Suzanne Ishee, President of the Center for Creative Placemaking, Stuart Koperweis, Vice-President of the Center for Creative Placemaking, and Dr. Colette Santasieri,  an expert in urban, environmental, civil infrastructure and land use planning.  Guest faculty from NJIT and sector-specific experts will augment the instruction.

Classes run 2 evenings per week for 10 weeks.  All classes will take place on the NJIT campus which is located in the University Heights neighborhood immediately adjacent to vibrant downtown Newark.  On campus parking will be available for class participants.  As well, the campus is easily accessible by short walk or local public transport to commuter rail stations.