Tag Archives: creativity

Spotlight on NJ’s Creative Placemakers

We are so proud of the exciting work that our Certified Creative Placemakers have been doing since their NJIT graduation in February that we have decided to share details about them with you!

Over the next few weeks, we will  put a spotlight on these change makers.  We will focus our lens on one of our graduates so that you can have a look at the individual ways their  local leadership integrates arts and culture into community, social and economic development planning and implementation activities.

Meet Tamara Contreras!

Tamara is leading organization of her community in Franklin Borough, Sussex County as  neighbors begin to undertake the revitalization of their historic downtown.  She is also helping to foster community pride through education and celebration of the borough’s rich history and many existing assets.  Her efforts are supported by the North Jersey Health Collaborative.

(Be sure to also click on a second video to enjoy more details about Tamara’s work with ‘Forward Franklin’!)

If you are interested in learning more about our upcoming class or for registration, click here.  For further questions, contact us!

 

 

 

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Fall Certificate in Creative Placemaking Scheduled

Building on the success of last Fall’s Certificate in Creative Placemaking course of study at NJIT, course dates are set for Fall, 2019.  Classes on the NJIT campus begin on Sept. 9th with course completion and graduation on Dec. 20th.

In other words, you can earn your Professional Certificate in Creative Placemaking by the end of this year!  Our inaugural class of graduates have already become the “go-to” change-agents in their communities.  You’ll be all set to join them at the the top of 2020!

 

To link to the course page,click here!
If you have questions, email  CCP or contact by phone at: 973-869-9748

New Jersey-Meet your newly Certified Creative Placemakers!

From the time I was in elementary school, my favorite time of the year was ‘class photo” day!  I loved these portraits of my fellow classmates and our teacher taken near the end of the school year, and I still have a number of them in my photo albums.  They make me smile every time I look at them and I continually challenge myself to see how many  names I remember.

My all-time favorite photo in my collection, however, will be the one you see here.  I won’t ever forget the names of these people and neither should you!

Bottom L-R, Gillian Sargeant-Allen, Tamara Contreras, Me (Lead faculty), Kaitlin Bundy
Top L-R-Susan Lazzari, Stephanie Neal, Pamela Daniels, Colette Santasieri (Core Faculty), Mark Cheatam

Nothing has given me more pride than to award certificates for successful completion of our rigorous course of study and launch of their individually designed local community initiatives.  I am honored to have had the opportunity to work with these extraordinarily dedicated and committed individuals who are already “doing New Jersey proud!”  In coming weeks, we will showcase the creativity and passion as change-agents through the diverse initiatives that they are undertaking.

In meantime, I hope you will  join me in saying “BRAVO” to these community champions.  They are ready to lead Creative Placemaking efforts in localities across our state and beyond!

Suzanne

Why is NOW the right time?

chicken.eggWhat comes first, the chicken or the egg?  In a rapidly growing era of new job creation, one could argue that it is often the chicken which comes first.  At least as far as new job creation in the field of Creative Placemaking, we can make this case.  The term “Creative Placemaking,” coined by former Chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, Rocco Landesman, was used to define a longstanding practice of utilizing the arts and culture to help revitalize communities.    Landesman became the “promoter-in-chief” of Creative Placemaking in 2010 by commissioning Ann Markusen and Anne Gadwa to write a white paper for the Mayor’s Institute on City Design.  The paper defined the term and was a seminal work in making a strong case for adoption of the practice.

According to the authors of the paper, “Creative placemaking animates public and private spaces, rejuvenates structures and streetscapes, improves local business viability and public safety, and brings diverse people together to celebrate, inspire, and be inspired.”   Landesman wisely set forth to create a funding mechanism for the practice separate from dependence on federal funding.  Instead, he brought together the leading executives from a dozen foundations   Kresge, Surdna, Mellon, Irvine, Knight, McKnight, Bloomberg and others – to partner in this pioneering work.  Luis Ubiñas of the Ford Foundation was the first chair to drive the collaboration, resulting in the creation of  ArtPlace America.

From our nation’s largest urban centers to the most quaint hamlets, in these relatively short eight years, the scope and practice of Creative Placemaking has grown faster and, I imagine, far beyond what even the early dreamers could have envisioned.  Over the years, as the field has spread across sectors of planning, engineering, technology, health, sustainability, governance, community and economic development, and further, the practice has been redefined and refined.

Professionals from all of these sectors are locally engaged in one or more aspects of their creative community planning primarily through volunteerism, as jobbers or within the capacity of their current job mandates.  Yet their resumes do not reflect recognition of professional expertise in the field.  Perhaps in a CV, one can expand on a description of their experience, but in the format of a resume, one  cannot identify themselves as “Creative Placemaker” without accompanying professional certification.

Why is “now” the right time for an institution of higher education to offer this professional Creative Placemaker certification?  Simply put, recent job openings describe Continue reading Why is NOW the right time?

Jersey City Cultural Leader: Public Art Specialist, Duda Penteado

After settling in Jersey City from Brazil, Duda Penteado’s story is a very personal one. As a fine artist living in Jersey City during the 9/11 attacks and America in it’s aftermath, Duda made a large body of celebrated works of art reflecting these events. From museum installations to memorials made of actual steel from the Twin Towers, his art looks at this difficult piece of history through the eye of someone who experienced it from a very close distance. Learn about his process and why Jersey City is his home.